Jordanna Matlon sociology, culture, peripheries.

In Brooklyn, gentrification wipes out pigeons and chickens to make room for cats and dogs

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Via theguardian.com
(via bitch-media)
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bitch-media:

Nevada Assemblywoman Lucy Flores is running to become the first Latina Lieutenant Governor of her state.  She’s no billionaire’s wife, no Ivy League prodigy, no daughter of some ruling-class family from Latin America.  Lucy Flores grew up poor in a family of 13 children. A daughter of immigrants, she dropped out of high school, got involved in gangs and spent time incarcerated. She saw all her sisters become teen mothers and didn’t want that for herself. When she became pregnant at 16, she had an abortion that she doesn’t regret.

She eventually turned her life around. She went to college and later law school. Yet she doesn’t twist her success into a bootstraps narrative of a self-made woman. Instead, she acknowledges all the support she got along the way.  She bears witness to the fact that it was the chance generosity of individuals, and not a reliable safety net in our society that made the difference. Her own lived experience becomes the basis of her progressive agenda for social change.

Lucy Flores defies the politics of respectability. She’s single, childless, honest about her sexual past, and fierce in her advocacy for poor and marginalized people.  She takes bold stands on immigration, education, and domestic violence. Her experience makes her an effective advocate, but it also makes her a new kind of role model for Latina women.  Like Justice Sonia Sotomayor before her, we are watching a smart, single, childless Latina rise from poverty to political authority.  But Flores’ background not only includes the “humble beginnings” of poverty, but the stigmatizing experiences that can accompany poverty, like jail, dropping out, and unplanned pregnancy. 

Read more of Aya de Leon’s article about Lucy Flores on Bitch Media

(via notime4yourshit)

14 African Nations Being Forced By France to Pay Taxes for the ‘Benefits’ of Colonialism

(via takeprideinyourheritage)
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takeprideinyourheritage:

Fourteen nations listed below are in agreement to deposit 65 percent of all foreign currency reserves in a shared reserve fund to France. The countries established the Monetary and Economic Union of West Africa. Their currency, the CFA-Franc, is printed under supervision of the French National Bank in Chamaliéres, France.

Christof Lehmann wrote for nsnbc.me in 2012, “France is indebting and enslaving Africans by means of Africa’s own wealth; for example: 12.0000 billion invested at three percent creates 360 billion in interests which France grants as credits to Africa at an interest rate of five to six percent or more. The allegory of ‘Bleeding Africa and Feeding France’ is no exaggeration, not alarmist, and not revolutionary.”

All numbers below according to the World Bank…..

(via intellectuellenoire)

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Via atlantablackstar.com

Steven Salaita: U. of I. destroyed my career

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Via chicagotribune.com

Neoliberal Freedom

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Thoughtful opinion piece by Paul Verhaeghe on Neoliberal freedoms:
Our society constantly proclaims that anyone can make it if they just try hard enough, all the while reinforcing privilege and putting increasing pressure on its overstretched and exhausted citizens. An increasing number of people fail, feeling humiliated, guilty and ashamed. We are forever told that we are freer to choose the course of our lives than ever before, but the freedom to choose outside the success narrative is limited. Furthermore, those who fail are deemed to be losers or scroungers, taking advantage of our social security system.
A neoliberal meritocracy would have us believe that success depends on individual effort and talents, meaning responsibility lies entirely with the individual and authorities should give people as much freedom as possible to achieve this goal. For those who believe in the fairytale of unrestricted choice, self-government and self-management are the pre-eminent political messages, especially if they appear to promise freedom. Along with the idea of the perfectible individual, the freedom we perceive ourselves as having in the west is the greatest untruth of this day and age.
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Via theguardian.com

Entrepreneurs and consumers: complicit masculinity on the African urban periphery - African Centre for Cities

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Until mid-November, I’m going to be a Visiting Scholar at the University of Cape Town’s African Centre for Cities. If you’re around on October 8th, please join me for my seminar, ‘Entrepreneurs and consumers: complicit masculinity on the African urban periphery’. Here is the abstract:

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Via africancentreforcities.net