Jordanna Matlon sociology, culture, peripheries.
(via artblackafrica)
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artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,Les Femmes D’Alger.

Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.

Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by there countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”

"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)

(via asad2abelo)

Lifetime Promises To Bring Out The 'Strong Black Woman' In White Women

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Read whole piece here.

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Via npr.org

Acting French

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Ta-Nehisi Coates narrates Bourdieu in this autobiography of race, culture, and educational attainment. Brilliantly.

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Via theatlantic.com

Man Arrested While Picking Up His Kids: 'The Problem Is I'm Black'

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Continue reading. Video included in full article.

Absolutely and utterly disturbing. And heartbreaking.

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Via theatlantic.com

Afro-Chinese marriages boom in Guangzhou: but will it be 'til death do us part'?

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scmp_13apr14_fe_afr_985_jen_wed_copy.jpg

Eman Okonkwo’s foot-tapping at the altar is not a sign of nerves. The groom’s palms aren’t sweaty, there are no pre-wedding jitters and certainly no second thoughts. Today he is realising a dream imagined by countless African merchants in Guangzhou: he is marrying a Chinese bride.

Seven days earlier, Jennifer Tsang’s family was oblivious to their daughter’s romance. Like many local women dating African men, the curvaceous trader from Foshan, who is in her late 20s - that dreaded “leftover woman” age - had feared her parents would be racially prejudiced.

Today, though - having tentatively given their blessing - they snuck into the underground Royal Victory Church, in Guangzhou, looking over their shoulders for police as they entered the downtown tower block. Non-state-sanctioned religious events like this are illegal on the mainland.

Okonkwo, 42, doesn’t have a single relative at the rambunctious Pentecostal ceremony, but is nevertheless delighted.

"Today is so special," beams the Nigerian, "because I have married a Chinese girl. And that makes me half-African, half-Chinese."

In Guangzhou, weddings like this take place every day. There are no official figures on Afro-Chinese marriages but visit any trading warehouse in the city and you will see scores of mixed-race couples running wholesale shops, their coffee-coloured, hair-braided children racing through the corridors.

While Okonkwo’s dream of becoming Chinese through matrimony is futile - the Guangzhou Public Security Bureau (PSB) denies African husbands any more rights than a tourist - his children, should he have any and they be registered under Tsang’s name, will possess a hukou residency permit and full Chinese citizenship.

The relationship with Africa that China has so aggressively courted for economic gain - 2012 saw a record US$198 billion of trade between the pair - is producing an unexpected return: the mainland’s first mixed-race generation with blood from a distant continent and the right to be Chinese.

Continue reading.

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Via scmp.com

Sociologists Take Historic Stand on Racism and Police Brutality

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Via sociology.about.com

Timeline Photos - Humans of New York | Facebook

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Via facebook.com

Black American Indians seek to honor their mixed ancestry | Al Jazeera America

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Via alj.am